Manatee Populations are Increasing

Industry News, Opinion Pieces, Underwater Discovery and Research

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If you have an interest in the state of the oceans and turn to Google for information, it is often easy to become discouraged and get lost within all of the negative stories and multiple challenges our waters face. That is why, whenever we come across a positive story about something ocean related we try to use our Blog as an avenue to share the good news.

Today we’re sharing a news story about the improving population numbers of the West Indian Manatee. In ECO Magazine’s latest edition, they feature a story that surrounds the recent announcement by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stating that the West Indian Manatee is “proposed to be downlisted from endangered to threatened status under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).”

While this is great news for ocean enthusiasts, since declining marine wildlife populations is a major threat to our oceans, this proposal is not the end of the battle. While in the process of becoming no longer listed as endangered, the populations still have not reached safe numbers. As such, the federal protections currently set in place by the ESA will still apply to this species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service “remains committed to conservation actions to fully recover manatee populations.”

The ESA’s definition of an endangered species is as follows: a species “currently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.”

Alternatively, they define a threatened species as: “one that is likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published its proposal in the federal register, which began a 90-day comment period.

To learn more about this topic and/or about what companies are doing to protect the manatees read the full story here.

If you have some positive ocean news please share with us in the comment section.

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