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Summer Student Feature: Meet Noah!

Noah Roberts   |   September 3, 2020

At Deep Trekker we’re delighted to welcome summer students to our team every year. We love sharing our awesome robots with all of the brilliant young minds in the Kitchener-Waterloo region. While he had a more socially distant, mask filled term than past students, we were thrilled to invite our 2020 summer student Noah to share his Deep Trekker experience!

Noah

Tell us about yourself.

My name is Noah, I am 15 and going into grade 10. I am the Summer Student Content Coordinator at Deep Trekker.

Tell us about your first few days on the job.

My first day was really fun overall. I got to meet the marketing team and I learned quite a bit about the ROVs at the pool. Going into it I was a bit nervous but that’s just how it is when you’re meeting new people. I’d say by the end of the day I was pretty comfortable with everyone, they were all very helpful and were always open to questions.

The marketing team hosted a welcome lunch for me and it was a good time to say the least. We had a patio lunch at a restaurant called “Malt and Barley” and it was a nice way to get to know the team a little bit better.

On the Friday of my first week I got to go to the lake and it was a great experience. There are a few things like canoes and tables set up underwater that are used to test the sonars and lights and the ROVs in general. I got to pilot the DT REVOLUTION and it felt super smooth to drive once I figured out all the controls!

What are your everyday tasks at the office?

When I started out at Deep Trekker I was updating the website through a software called contentful, which helped me get familiar with the robots. As of recently I’ve been transferring all of their images of the robots to a software called Pics.io to make it easier to find any specific image.

Recently I have been going in at 9am, opening the “file explorer” and Pics.io and I go through photos and pick anything that I think would be helpful in some way. Then, I take an image and drag it to a specific Pics.io folder which is where I put a title and description that matches the photo. When that’s finished I tag the photos with any words that relate to that specific photo. After that I press the upload button and move on to the next picture. So far we’ve uploaded about 700 photos to Pics.io.

I work the most with Deep Trekker’s Technical Trainer Alexander because he took a large portion of the photos and videos, so he knows a lot more about the origin of the photos than I do. He’s been explaining what images would be useful and what keywords (tags) should be used in general types of photos. I’ve been helping him out by giving him time to do his virtual training sessions and edit content for demos, online trade shows, and the website.

Can you tell us about life at Deep Trekker?

In my opinion it’s a great first job and the people here are awesome. I’m also dipping my toes into an office job so I’m going to have an idea of what it’s like to do a job like this.

I like that I can have a set of things to do for the day and just do them. I always have something to do whether it be transferring photos to Pics.io or tagging along with Alexander on one of his trainings. One of the biggest benefits is that I had a really good job experience and can build my resume for future jobs, but I’d say my overall favourite part is when everyone in the office just starts talking about something completely random out of nowhere because it’s a nice break from whatever the task at hand is.

Going through the photos and seeing the development of the robots and even the controllers has been really cool to see. They went from a yellow “toy” looking controller to a sleek black design on their new controllers. The amount of attachments that can go on the robots is pretty interesting as well especially when I get an explanation of how it works. One cool attachment is called a Cygnus Thickness Gauge and it can tell how thick a wall is by sending vibrations through the wall.

The people here at Deep Trekker are super nice and the vibe is just really chill overall. The working environment is so much nicer than anything I’ve had in school. It can get pretty competitive when the words “ping pong” are mentioned but other than that, it’s a great group! (Not to say that I’m not enjoying the competitiveness cause it is always a good time when Martin and Tristan finish a ping pong match!)

Advice for Future Deep Trekker Summer Students

It can get tough at times but if you put some music on with your headphones in you’ll have a good experience and it’ll all be worth it when you walk out at the end of the summer with great experiences and some money in your bank account. Also, never hesitate to ask any questions because I am sure that anyone here would be happy to help. Another tip would be to bring a sweater or long sleeve shirt because it gets really cold in here sometimes.

If you plan on applying here I think you should take a look at the Deep Trekker website to learn the names of the robots and maybe check out the “Company” tab just so that you have somewhat of an understanding of the robots and the company so you aren’t just going in blind.

My interview was with Alexander and Brendan and it was pretty casual and positive. I got to know a little more about what I was going to be doing for the company and it was definitely a great first experience with an interview and the job.

Noah2

We sincerely thank Noah for his time and hard work at Deep Trekker! To learn more about working at Deep Trekker check out our careers page!