Skip to main content
Back to News

History of Women in Aquaculture

Rachel Doornekamp   |   October 14, 2019

Aquaculture gives us an excellent opportunity for global food security, making it one of the fastest growing food production sectors worldwide. As the demand and need for seafood exceeds the limitations placed on fisheries

Aquaculture gives us an excellent opportunity for global food security, making it one of the fastest growing food production sectors worldwide. As the demand and need for seafood exceeds the limitations placed on fisheries, The World Bank predicts that aquaculture will be the world’s primary source of seafood by 2030. In addition to providing a sustainable source of protein, aquaculture provides thousands of jobs for both established and emerging economies.

Women play a vital role in aquaculture, with the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation reporting that women make up 70% of the aquaculture workforce worldwide. As seafood becomes an increasingly vital source of nutrition worldwide, gender equality throughout the supply chain is absolutely imperative for global food security.

We featured women in aquaculture earlier this year, but felt that it was important to look at how women paved the way in the history of aquaculture.

A Look Back

Gender Aquafish noted that the study of women in aquaculture can be difficult as official statistics to track female involvement in aquaculture can be scarce, despite evidence of active participation by women throughout aquaculture history. The lack of gender specific statistics mean that many of women’s contributions to aquaculture may not be recognized.

According to Alimentarium, the earliest evidence of fish farming dates back to before 1000 BCE. Many historical accounts note that men and women often worked, and continue to work, in tandem with complementary roles as part of a team.

Despite being often restricted or controlled, women have made big strides in the aquaculture industry as both labourers and managers of production processes.

What’s to Come?

Gender Aquafish reported that over the last four decades more women than ever have graduated from higher education institutes in studies relating to aquaculture, with gender parity being achieved in some cases. As a result the number of women in highly skilled areas of aquaculture including laboratory technicians and research positions are increasing.

We would, of course, be remiss to write a blog about women in aquaculture without mentioning our fearless leader Sam Macdonald. By developing advanced ROVs for cage, mooring and feeding system inspections, net repair, mort retrieval and removal, and stock health monitoring, Deep Trekker has been able to provide safe, effective and innovative solutions to the aquaculture industry.

Learn more about what Deep Trekker can do for aquaculture or contact us for more information.

Learn More About Our Products

View Products

Looking for Resources on Our Products?

View Resources

See What Our Customers are Saying

Our Stories